eczema infographicEczema Infographic

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<img src=”http://www.rivieraallergy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Everything-You-Should-Know-About-Eczema.jpg” alt=”Everything You Should Know About Eczema Infographic”></br><a href=”http://www.rivieraallergy.com/articles/everything-you-should-know-about-eczema/”>Eczema Infographic</a>
Eczema, also known as dermatitis, is a skin condition affecting 1/4 of all dermatological patients. There are two main categories of eczema known as contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis. Some less common forms are neurodermatitis, nummular dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and stasis dermatitis. Eczema produces dry, cracking, bumping, flaking, and rashes on the skin. Although the causes of eczema are unknown, there are some conditions that can worsen or lead to an outbreak. Cold weather, dry environment, pollution, household chemicals, dry skin, allergens, and stress can all contribute to eczema symptoms. Though there is no cure for eczema, there are treatments and preventative measures that can reduce the chance of outbreak. Moisturizing, soft fabrics, good hygiene, and avoiding allergens and irritant triggers can all help prevent breakouts.

There are also prescription skin creams which can help. It is important to see a skin and allergy doctor to identify your triggers and learn about possible treatments for your particular skin type. Contact dermatitis is the most common workplace illness and affects nearly everyone at some point in their lifetime. There are two types of contact dermatitis; Irritant contact dermatitis, which is caused by household chemicals or synthetic materials that irritate the skin and cause a breakout. The other type is allergic contact dermatitis, which is caused by allergens. A common allergen that affects many people is poison ivy, which causes rashes upon contact. Though atopic dermatitis is not contagious, it is thought to have a genetic factor. Asthma and hay fever in the family can dramatically increase a person’s susceptibility to eczema. Eczema generally appears in early childhood, between 2 to 6 months of birth. Though eczema cannot be cured, the symptoms usually disappear or dramatically decrease by age 6.

Eczema produces dry, cracking, bumping, flaking, and rashes on the skin. Although the causes of eczema are unknown, there are some conditions that can worsen or lead to an outbreak. Cold weather, dry environment, pollution, household chemicals, dry skin, allergens, and stress can all contribute to eczema symptoms. Though there is no cure for eczema, there are treatments and preventative measures that can reduce the chance of outbreak. Moisturizing, soft fabrics, good hygiene, and avoiding allergens and irritant triggers can all help prevent breakouts. There are also prescription skin creams which can help. It is important to see a skin and allergy doctor to identify your triggers and learn about possible treatments for your particular skin type. Contact dermatitis is the most common workplace illness and affects nearly everyone at some point in their lifetime. There are two types of contact dermatitis; Irritant contact dermatitis, which is caused by household chemicals or synthetic materials that irritate the skin and cause a breakout. The other type is allergic contact dermatitis, which is caused by allergens. A common allergen that affects many people is poison ivy, which causes rashes upon contact. Though atopic dermatitis is not contagious, it is thought to have a genetic factor. Asthma and hay fever in the family can dramatically increase a person’s susceptibility to eczema. Eczema generally appears in early childhood, between 2 to 6 months of birth. Though eczema cannot be cured, the symptoms usually disappear or dramatically decrease by age 6.

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